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BEUYS AND CAGE


This research paper is an exploration of the spatial practices which John Cage and Joseph Beuys developed as Fluxus practicioners. Fluxus is a verb meaning to ‘flow outwards’ or ‘continuous succession of changes’. This definition was coined by Lithuanian American artist George Maciunas, who envisaged Fluxus as a shared attitude rather than a movement. individuals who practiced Fluxus weren’t bound by discipline and weren’t unified by ‘style’. They believed that the reading of objects and environments could constitute a performance in its own right. Fluxus works therefore became known as language happenings. The project investigates Beuys and Cage, as they both constructed their creative practice from the bottom-up, focussing entirely on the dialogue between participant and subject matter. Analysis of their practices has served as a foundation on which to question the spatial function of fluxus.


Both of these practicioners endeavoured to sharpen user perception. The connection between individual and environment was therefore not applied for expressive communication. Recalibration of understanding is a question of challenging the normal way of seeing things: the creation of a paradox.


The Benign and the Feral:


“I Like America and America Likes me” by Joseph Beuys is antithetical to expressive art. It depicts a harsh co-existence, in contrast to the benign relationship of the “Madonna and Child.”

Juxtaposition 1

Instrumentality and Non-Instrumentality:


Instrumental architecture denies the opportunity for new understanding. Contrastingly, the open-endedness of Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Conical Intersect” raises questions about the familiar by re-framing it.

Juxtaposition 2

Material and Creative Intent:


Beuys posited that “all language is an act of transformation” which he embodied through his work by recognising the material intent of his mediums and enabling them. Contrastingly, sculpting fluid forms from stone is an act of challenging.

Juxtaposition 3

Tuning the Unconscious Optics:


A paradox was a facet of works by Beuys and Cage which enabled them to celebrate the uniqueness of otherwise overlooked things and focus the unconscious optics without adaption to subject matter.

Juxtaposition 4

BEUYS AND CAGE


This research paper is an exploration of the spatial practices which John Cage and Joseph Beuys developed as Fluxus practicioners. Fluxus is a verb meaning to ‘flow outwards’ or ‘continuous succession of changes’. This definition was coined by Lithuanian American artist George Maciunas, who envisaged Fluxus as a shared attitude rather than a movement. individuals who practiced Fluxus weren’t bound by discipline and weren’t unified by ‘style’. They believed that the reading of objects and environments could constitute a performance in its own right. Fluxus works therefore became known as language happenings. The project investigates Beuys and Cage, as they both constructed their creative practice from the bottom-up, focussing entirely on the dialogue between participant and subject matter. Analysis of their practices has served as a foundation on which to question the spatial function of fluxus.


Both of these practicioners endeavoured to sharpen user perception. The connection between individual and environment was therefore not applied for expressive communication. Recalibration of understanding is a question of challenging the normal way of seeing things: the creation of a paradox.


The Benign and the Feral:


“I Like America and America Likes me” by Joseph Beuys is antithetical to expressive art. It depicts a harsh co-existence, in contrast to the benign relationship of the “Madonna and Child.”

Juxtaposition 1

Instrumentality and Non-Instrumentality:


Instrumental architecture denies the opportunity for new understanding. Contrastingly, the open-endedness of Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Conical Intersect” raises questions about the familiar by re-framing it.

Juxtaposition 2

Material and Creative Intent:


Beuys posited that “all language is an act of transformation” which he embodied through his work by recognising the material intent of his mediums and enabling them. Contrastingly, sculpting fluid forms from stone is an act of challenging.

Juxtaposition 3

Tuning the Unconscious Optics:


A paradox was a facet of works by Beuys and Cage which enabled them to celebrate the uniqueness of otherwise overlooked things and focus the unconscious optics without adaption to subject matter.

Juxtaposition 4

BEUYS AND CAGE


This research paper is an exploration of the spatial practices which John Cage and Joseph Beuys developed as Fluxus practicioners. Fluxus is a verb meaning to ‘flow outwards’ or ‘continuous succession of changes’. This definition was coined by Lithuanian American artist George Maciunas, who envisaged Fluxus as a shared attitude rather than a movement. individuals who practiced Fluxus weren’t bound by discipline and weren’t unified by ‘style’. They believed that the reading of objects and environments could constitute a performance in its own right. Fluxus works therefore became known as language happenings. The project investigates Beuys and Cage, as they both constructed their creative practice from the bottom-up, focussing entirely on the dialogue between participant and subject matter. Analysis of their practices has served as a foundation on which to question the spatial function of fluxus.


Both of these practicioners endeavoured to sharpen user perception. The connection between individual and environment was therefore not applied for expressive communication. Recalibration of understanding is a question of challenging the normal way of seeing things: the creation of a paradox.


“I Like America and America Likes me” by Joseph Beuys is antithetical to expressive art. It depicts a harsh co-existence, in contrast to the benign relationship of the “Madonna and Child.”

Juxtaposition 1

Instrumental architecture denies the opportunity for new understanding. Contrastingly, the open-endedness of Gordon Matta-Clark’s “Conical Intersect” raises questions about the familiar by re-framing it.

Juxtaposition 2

Beuys posited that “all language is an act of transformation” which he embodied through his work by recognising the material intent of his mediums and enabling them. Contrastingly, sculpting fluid forms from stone is an act of challenging.

Juxtaposition 3

A paradox was a facet of works by Beuys and Cage which enabled them to celebrate the uniqueness of otherwise overlooked things and focus the unconscious optics without adaption to subject matter.

Juxtaposition 4