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impression of place / Newtongrange

In the early stages of this project, the design unit was focussed on examining the Lady Victoria Colliery in Newtongrange, a derelict coal mine now serving as a museum. Although a physical site was not allocated, close analysis of this building was integral to the ambition of defining a tectonic language. A reciprocity between landscape and archi-tectonic elements was fundamental in the creation of a proposal which would be firmly rooted in its phenomenal context.


Objectively speaking, Lady Victoria Colliery is now obsolete. While the masonry fabric crumbles away, the solid mechanised elements remain intact and litter the site. Not only do the machines of the colliery stand the test of time in a physical sense, they remain powerfully symbolic of the colliery. Despite no longer functioning as a building, these relics are totems which recall its original function.


The focus on isolated components of the Colliery rather than a 'zoomed out' perspective to account for the site on a larger scale informed the methodology of manufacturing a landscape. Elements of each machine could be modelled and re-scaled - a process of drawing out the significant from the forgotten. Rather than drawing from literal features, certain characteristics were identified and then articulated. In particular, the relationship between materials of different densities was a point of focus.

Machinery as Totemic

Translation of Light into Form

When translating properties examined in the colliery onto paper, a key consideration was the disparity in scale. Physical models were used to generate interpretations of what was gathered on site in the studio space. In the case of the Colliery undercroft, a combination of solid machinery and delicate light was not a condition which could be directly reproduced. Through the use of Grasshopper algorithims, a physical form was generated from the quality of light observerd on site.


Rather than responding directly to the physical site, the approach of manufacturing a landscape was characterised by this noton of interpretation and generation. From the range of significant qualities observed in the Colliery, such as the interdependance of heavy and light materials to the quality of light, a tectonic index was formed. This physical model was used to explore how a strategy for assembly could be applied in this regard.

Defining a Tectonic Pallette

Engagement with Existing Structure

Section through Anti Chamber

Plan of Shadow Flux Rods

impression of place / Newtongrange

In the early stages of this project, the design unit was focussed on examining the Lady Victoria Colliery in Newtongrange, a derelict coal mine now serving as a historical museum. Although a physical site was not allocated, close analysis of this building was integral to the ambition of defining a tectonic language. A reciprocity between landscape and archi-tectonic elements was fundamental in the creation of a proposal which would be firmly rooted in its phenomenal context.


Objectively speaking, Lady Victoria Colliery is now obsolete. While the masonry fabric crumbles away, the solid mechanised elements remain intact and litter the site. Not only do the machines of the colliery stand the test of time in a physical sense, they remain powerfully symbolic of the colliery. Despite no longer functioning as a building, these relics are totems which recall its original function.


The focus on isolated components of the Colliery rather than a 'zoomed out' perspective to account for the site on a larger scale informed the methodology of manufacturing a landscape. Elements of each machine could be modelled and re-scaled - a process of drawing out the significant from the forgotten. Rather than drawing from literal features, certain characteristics were identified and then articulated. In particular, the relationship between materials of different densities was a point of focus.

Machinery as Totemic

Translation of Light into Form

Physical models were used to generate interpretations of what was gathered on site in the studio space. In the case of the Colliery undercroft, Grasshopper algorithims were used to generate a physical form based on the quality of light observerd on site.


The approach of manufacturing a landscape was characterised by this noton of interpretation and generation. From the range of qualities observed, such as the interdependance of heavy and light materials to the quality of light, a tectonic index was formed. This physical model was used to explore how a strategy for assembly could be applied.

Defining a Tectonic Pallette

Engagement with Existing Structure

Section through Anti Chamber

Plan of Shadow Flux Rods

impression of place / Newtongrange

In the early stages of this project, the design unit was focussed on examining the Lady Victoria Colliery in Newtongrange, a derelict coal mine now serving as a historical museum. Although a physical site was not allocated, close analysis of this building was integral to the ambition of defining a tectonic language. A reciprocity between landscape and archi-tectonic elements was fundamental in the creation of a proposal which would be firmly rooted in its phenomenal context.


Objectively speaking, Lady Victoria Colliery is now obsolete. While the masonry fabric crumbles away, the solid mechanised elements remain intact and litter the site. Not only do the machines of the colliery stand the test of time in a physical sense, they remain powerfully symbolic of the colliery. Despite no longer functioning as a building, these relics are totems which recall its original function.


The focus on isolated components of the Colliery rather than a 'zoomed out' perspective to account for the site on a larger scale informed the methodology of manufacturing a landscape. Elements of each machine could be modelled and re-scaled - a process of drawing out the significant from the forgotten. Rather than drawing from literal features, certain characteristics were identified and then articulated. In particular, the relationship between materials of different densities was a point of focus.

Machinery as Totemic

Translation of Light into Form

Physical models were used to generate interpretations of what was gathered on site in the studio space. In the case of the Colliery undercroft, a combination of solid machinery and delicate light was translated through Grasshopper algorithims.


The approach of manufacturing a landscape was characterised by this noton of interpretation and generation. From the range of significant qualities observed, such as the interdependance of heavy and light materials to the quality of light, a tectonic index was formed. This physical model was used to explore how a strategy for assembly could then be applied.

Defining a Tectonic Pallette

Engagement with Existing Structure

Section through Anti Chamber

Plan of Shadow Flux Rods