placeholder
placeholder

Concept Sketch

Moments along the Route

Broomielaw Elevation and Location Plan

Exploded Isometric

Objective and Subjective Views

Long Section

Cabinet Perspective

Situated between the Clyde and Broomielaw, the site for this project was very narrow. At the beginning of site investigations, it was apparent that the physical constraints, as well as the civic nature of the context would be jointly significant. From the beginning, I was interested in the blurred boundary between creation and experience. Taking into account the brief to design a building for civic domesticity, and a site which lent itself to spatial overlap, I pursued the idea of a 'de-veloped theatre' where the intellectual and physical processes behind production could be experienced by the public.


Theatrical production can be categorized into three key stages: writing, set construction and rehearsal. Despite their instrumentality, they each have unique characteristics, which can be brought into relief architecturally. Realising these activities as experiential is about re-framing them as individual moments and not instrumental stages.


The production line of the theatre runs in parallel with a public route which allows access into the inner workings of the building. The proximity between these two lines of travel creates interface between staff and public, whilst maintaining separation between them. The public route is for use during the day, whereas the auditorium is about spectacle, which would be most active during the night. As an urban building which enables everyday experience, it is rooted to the highly pedestrian context of the river walkway.


The various spatial requirements of each department of the theatre and the connections between staff and public are enabled through the tectonic of the ‘cabinet’. These consist of suspended CLT panels enclosing cellular volumes which take on a variety of sectional configurations, depending on the activities which they accommodate. Timber beams connect the suspended panels at different levels, creating a varied sectional distribution of rooms.

Interface Atrium Model

Concept Sketch

Moments along the Route

Broomielaw Elevation and Location Plan

Exploded Isometric

Objective and Subjective Views

Long Section

Cabinet Perspective

Situated between the Clyde and Broomielaw, the site for this project was very narrow. At the beginning of site investigations, it was apparent that the physical constraints, as well as the civic nature of the context would be jointly significant. From the beginning, I was interested in the blurred boundary between creation and experience. Taking into account the brief to design a building for civic domesticity, and a site which lent itself to spatial overlap, I pursued the idea of a 'de-veloped theatre' where the intellectual and physical processes behind production could be experienced by the public.


The production line of the theatre runs in parallel with a public route which allows access into the inner workings of the building. The proximity between these two lines of travel creates interface between staff and public, whilst maintaining separation between them. The various spatial requirements of each department of the theatre and the connections between staff and public are enabled through the tectonic of the ‘cabinet’. These consist of suspended CLT panels enclosing cellular volumes which take on a variety of sectional configurations, depending on the activities which they accommodate. Timber beams connect the suspended panels at different levels, creating a varied sectional distribution of rooms.

Interface Atrium Model

Concept Sketch

Moments along the Route

Broomielaw Elevation and Location Plan

Exploded Isometric

Objective and Subjective Views

Long Section

Cabinet Perspective

Interface Atrium Model

Situated between the Clyde and Broomielaw, the site for this project was very narrow. At the beginning of site investigations, it was apparent that the physical constraints, as well as the civic nature of the context would be jointly significant. From the beginning, I was interested in the blurred boundary between creation and experience. Taking into account the brief to design a building for civic domesticity, and a site which lent itself to spatial overlap, I pursued the idea of a 'de-veloped theatre' where the intellectual and physical processes behind production could be experienced by the public.


The production line of the theatre runs in parallel with a public route which allows access into the inner workings of the building. The proximity between these two lines of travel creates interface between staff and public, whilst maintaining separation between them. The various spatial requirements of each department of the theatre and the connections between staff and public are enabled through the tectonic of the ‘cabinet’. These consist of suspended CLT panels enclosing cellular volumes which take on a variety of sectional configurations, depending on the activities which they accommodate. Timber beams connect the suspended panels at different levels, creating a varied sectional distribution of rooms.